Boy Hand Puppet

Boy Hand Puppet

Puppetry is an ancient form of artistic expression that’s a variation on human or storytelling theatrical productions. Back in puppetry, a drama unfolds that is completely or mostly acted out by specific symbolic objects, which can be manipulated by a puppeteer. The human animator may or might not be visible to your audience. Cultural variations of puppetry developed independently in many areas of the planet, with exceptional types still carried on today in Japan, China, Germany, Indonesia, and the USA, among other areas. Some special puppets became international icons in the age of television, including Howdy Doody, Lamp Chop, and Jim Henson’s Muppets

  • Various types of folk art puppetry developed in diverse areas of the world, and some of it’s still practiced today. In Japan, the profoundly sophisticated bunraku tradition evolved out of rites practiced in Shinto temples. Indonesian shadow puppets are just another illustration of a long-held folk tradition. Ceremonial puppets were also used in many pre-Columbian Native American civilizations.

  • Starting at the turn of the 20th century, a cultural mindset arose in Europe and the USA in which puppets began to be utilised in an experimental way, aimed solely at adult audiences. In productions spurred by this motion, a performance might combine actors and puppets or use celebrities as if they were puppets. Some productions also combined puppetry with mask theater, juxtaposing hidden actors, puppets, and other objects inside a minimalist visual universe onstage. Today, an event described as puppet theater might not include rod puppets, marionettes, or hand puppets, based upon the intended message and the viewer.